More hiking in August, 2021: a witch’s castle, an artesian spring, and waterfalls

In addition to our walk at Nehalem Bay earlier in the month, we hiked three other days in August before going on our trip to the Olympic Mountains at the end of the month.

8-17-2021 – Wildwood Trail/Witches Castle

We added another 2 miles to our section hike of the Wildwood Trail.

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A five mile loop – Wildwood Trail to Birch Trail to Holman Lane

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The forest was dry and dusty today

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Balch Creek

This segment of the Wildwood Trail passes by the “Witches Castle”, formerly a visitor center, now a destination for various graffiti artists and partiers, and a colorful landmark in the green forest.

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Meanwhile, in the forest, harbingers of fall in the maple trees….

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We only have 5 miles remaining in our pandemic thru hike.

8-22-2021 – Dry Creek Falls

We returned to this short hike in the gorge with our visiting  daughter. And I noted that, while we were not in Iceland, we were looking at a waterfall and columnar basalts…

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Dry Creek

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Dry Creek Falls

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Columnar basalts

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Columnar basalts, vine maples and cedar branches

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Bridge on the PCT over Dry Creek

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There were a few colorful flowers and berries along the trail…

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Fireweed

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Penstemon

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Solomon seal

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And the evil poison oak, showing its fall colors

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A ghost tree along the path.

8 26-2021  Little Zigzag Falls and Little Crater Lake, Mt Hood

We planned to hike up high on Mt Hood today, but the cloud cover directed us otherwise.

Little Zigzag Falls – We’ve never stopped here before because the hike is so short – less than a mile round trip. This trail through beautiful green forest along a mountain stream will be a good one to keep in mind for visitors on the grand round-the-mountain tour.

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Remnants of the old Mt Hood Highway near the trailhead

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The trail follows along the edge of Little Zigzag Creek

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Little Zigzag Falls

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Rock-hugging tree at the top of the falls

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View upstream from the top of the falls

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Another view of Little Zigzag Falls

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Exposed tree roots near the falls

Little Crater Lake – This lake, south of Mt Hood, has long been on my ‘to visit’ list.

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The lake is an easy walk from the trail head.

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Little Crater Lake

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The true blue color…

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The lake is not actually a crater – it was formed by an artesian spring.

The blue clarity of the water is mesmerizing. I love the reflections. My little camera has a hard time catching the actually vibrancy of the turquoise blue, but none of the brighter blues here are exaggerated.

We continued to a section of the Pacific Crest Trail that follows the northern arm of Timothy Lake, where we found more lovely views and foliage.

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PCT to Timothy Lake

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Northern arm of Timothy Lake

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More reflections…

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We passed by Little Crater Lake again on our return hike – once again admiring the deep blue and the reflections.

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Little Crater Lake again

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Siltstone stratigraphy

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Reflections and abstractions

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I plan to return next spring when the wildflowers are blooming!

August 2021 – summer gardens, knitting an albatross, the wing and the wheel….

August turned out a bit differently than planned, as we had to cancel travel due to the spread of the delta variant of Covid-19. I celebrated another birthday, walked the neighborhood, ate lots of fresh garden tomatoes, knitted, sewed masks, enjoyed my daughter’s visit, and went on a few hikes (next post). 

Neighborhood and garden

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Summer roses

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Echinacea

 

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Shadows

 

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View to downtown from Alameda Ridge from the top of…

 

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the 38th Avenue stairs.

 

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Signs of support in the neighborhood…

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Water splashing in the Beverly Cleary sculpture garden.

 

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Harbinger…

 

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Puffy clouds in the evening sky,

 

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Half moon rising,

 

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Alpenglow

 

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Farmer’s market and garden bounty

 

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Birthday cupcakes and books

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Knitting and sewing

An Albatross –

I finished knitting an Albatross Chick, pattern by Rachel Borello Carroll. The face and legs are perfect, the body and wings a less accurate reproduction, but I love having the chick on my shelf.

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During our travels in New Zealand in February of 2020, we saw albatross chicks in their nests at the Royal Albatross Center in Taiaroa.

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Albatross, taken from the bird blind at Pukekura/Taiaroa Head, February, 2020

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After we returned home, almost immediately into pandemic lockdown, I discovered the albatross chick Atawhai, who we probably saw on our visit, was live on camera 24/7 on the Albatross Webcam: https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-animals/birds/birds…

I spent many a moment of zen during this pandemic, watching Atawhai sitting in the beautiful landscape that we visited, the beaches we walked upon beyond. Atawhai fledged in September of 2020.

This year I have been watching the new season of albatross on the webcam. There is a new fluffy chick named Tiaki, who will also fledge soon. She is down to only a few fluffy feathers, and spends lots of time stretching her wings in the wind (wingspan about 3 meters!) One day in the next month, the wind and wings will catch together successfully, and she will fly off for a few years, somehow knowing how to dive into the water to get food, having never touched it before. And new chicks will be hatched in January. The photos here are screenshots from the Webcam.

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Other knitting and sewing: I finished two more hats for donation, and made new masks for my daughter.

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Not traveling

Our travel destination turned from orange to red the week before departure, so we will not be walking through the Mid Atlantic Ridge, not watching an active volcano in the twilight, not walking along the shores of a glacial lake with floating icebergs, or seeing the birds and marine life of the North Atlantic ocean. We thought we would be too early for northern lights, but I was looking forward to seeing the lopi yarn, the black sand beaches, all the recent volcanic features, and the many waterfalls….   I heard an interesting discussion about the ethics of making the choice to not get vaccinated, and whether people making that choice (excepting those with true medical reasons) should have consequences. I fall squarely on the side of yes they should, and not because my travel plans are delayed. People are dying, people are surviving with long term consequences. Everyone’s life has been interrupted, and will continue to be until herd immunity can be achieved. So yes, I think that those selfishly ignoring the science, unwilling or unable to evaluate all the misinformation out there for what it is (more divisive rhetoric from the right wing patriarchy), should be restricted in their ability to move through public spaces freely, especially when they won’t offer the courtesy of at least wearing a frigging mask! It is a public health emergency!

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RIP Nanci Griffith

We lost one of my favorite singer songwriters this month. I have been listening to her beautiful voice and poetry for more than 40 years, and will continue to listen. 

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There’s a pale sky in the east, all the stars are in the west
Oh, here’s to all the dreamers, may our open hearts find rest
The wing and the wheel are gonna carry us along
And we’ll have memories for company, long after the songs are gone.

Nanci Griffith – Wing and the Wheel

 

A walk on the beach – Nehalem Bay, Oregon

Nehalem Bay State Park, Oregon,   August 3, 2021

Too hot for hiking inland, we decided to drive out to the coast and walk the loop around Nehalem Bay spit.

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The green line is our track – about 5 miles round trip.

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Crossing the spit to the ocean beach.

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View north to Neahkanie Mountain.

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We are walking south, wind at our back, to the Nehalem Jetty.

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Equestrians on the tidal bars.

Most of the birds we saw were near the jetty.

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Nehalem Jetty

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The rock jetty was also a catch for sand and drift wood.

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Nehalem River north jetty

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Looking across to the south jetty and shore.

We found a lunch spot on the jetty with a wind shelter. After lunch, we crossed to the inland shore of the spit, and walked north along the Nehalem River/Bay, with different views and shore features, and the added advantage of being less windy.

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Mussels in the low tide zone.

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Looking back seaward

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Walking north along Nehalem Bay

Some of the marine life washed up in the low tide zone:

Continuing north along Nehalem Bay:

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Looking for clams.

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We enjoyed our day at the beach – fresh air, mountain and ocean views, a few birds.

On our return drive, we stopped at the highway overlook in Oswald West State Park, to look back at Nehalem Bay and the jetty. And to once again thank former Oregon governor, Oswald West, for claiming the beaches in Oregon as public land, in 1911.

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Looking south from Oswald West overlook

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Nehalem River Jetty

July 2021, a miscellany

July has been low key, with an episode of busyness near the end, when we had house guests and a long awaited wedding celebration of a good friend. Otherwise, I have been knitting, hiking, walking the neighborhood, growing  tomatoes, attending zoom and back yard knitting and book group meetings, and watching Le Tour de France and the Tokyo Olympics. And avoiding exposure to the Delta variant of Covid 19, so masking up in stores again, and keeping all contact with non household people as sanitary as possible. Sigh, but it must be done!

Knitting –

I finished a gnome, a charity hat and a pair of gift socks.

I finished the face embroidery on my albatross, and have another pile of works in progress:

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Albatross by Rachel Borello Carrol

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WIPS – Two hats, a pair of socks, a cardigan.

Neighborhood and Garden –

Hot dry days and colorful flowers.

Hikes –

Keeping pace with weekly hikes. Still avoiding weekends, and dodging heat. 

July 6 – Lookout Mountain, east of Mt Hood. Always enjoyable for the flowers and the views this time of year.

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Mt St Helens, from a blooming High Prairie, near the trailhead.

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Mt Hood from the summit of Lookout Mountain.

July 20 – Larch Mountain Crater – north of Mt Hood, a 7 mile loop that circles the top of Larch Mountain through very quiet green forest. At the top there are views to all the Cascades north and south:

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The quiet forest below the summit.

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Some of the views from Sherrard Point:

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Mt Hood

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Close up of Mt Hood

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Mt Jefferson through the haze.

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Mt Adams to the north, beyond the burn zone

July 15 and 28 – Wildwood Trail, Forest Park – We hiked two sections from the NW 53rd trailhead, and now have only 7 miles to go to complete the entire Wildwood trail, a pandemic aspiration.

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Dry and shady, Wildwood Trail near mile 10, July 15, 2021

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Two July hikes on the Wildwood Trail.

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Wildwood Trail near mile 8, July 28, 2021

A few of the flowers in the forest:

 

Other events: 

On to August….

NZ2020: Days 10 and 11, Walking the Kepler Track near Te Anau, lots of rain, and a film

February 3rd and 4th, 2020 – Te Anau, New Zealand. After returning from our Doubtful Sound cruise, we were supposed to go to Milford Sound. As described in my earlier post, we were experiencing extreme rain and flooding throughout Fiordland. Many roads were washed out. Our guides improvised some other adventures for us, based near Te Anau.

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Trail sign, locations of our next two hikes circled. The diagram shows how these lakes are interconnected to the huge hydropower scheme that ends up at Doubtful Sound, where we were the previous day.

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Yes, it rains!

February 3, 2020

After lunch, we zipped up our rain gear and set off on a 6 mile hike near the shores of Lake Te Anau on the Kepler Track.  We passed through beautifully green rainforest, and crossed a river that was swollen with runoff. We paused at Brod Bay on Lake Te Anau, our turnaround point, then walked back the way we came.

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Starting off on the Kepler Track in our rain gear.

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A swollen creek entering the lake.

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Brod Bay beach, turnaround point.

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Walking through the rain forest.

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Another view toward Te Anau across the lake.

February 4, 2020

The next morning, with rain still falling, and many surrounding roads still closed, we set off on a different stretch of the Kepler Track, this time along the Rainbow Reach to Moturau Hut, a 7.5 mile hike.

We crossed the Waiau River bridge, above a swollen river.

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Waiau River

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One of the highlights was passing through a wetland near Spirit Lake, with amazingly colorful plantlife and beautiful reflections in the water. On a nicer day I could have spent a lot of time here playing with the lights and reflections with my camera. 

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Wetland side trip

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Spirit Lake, rain.

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We arrived at Moturau Hut, near Lake Manapouri, where we paused long enough to eat lunch. The rain continued to fall during our return hike, again through the lush and green rainforest.

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View from Moturau Hut to Lake Manapouri

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Rainforest trail with possum trap.

 

I took two pictures from the same vantage point, about three hours apart, that show how Waiau River still rising.

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9:20 am

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12:30 pm

Later that afternoon, after we had dried off, we visited a pub in the town of Te Anau, and then went to the Fiordland Cinema, and watched a film called Ata Whenua – Shadowland. The movie was made by some of the Lord of the Rings film makers, and included gorgeous cinematography and ethereal music depicting the beautiful Fiordland landscape that we could not see because of all the rain.

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Serious Jenga at the Redcliff Cafe.

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Another map of our Kepler Track hikes.

Meanwhile, our guides were creating a new agenda for the next day, an impromptu tour of Southland, since all the roads in every other direction were closed by flooding.

 

Six Hikes in June, 2021

We had six hiking days in June, all repeat hikes, so I am showing just a few highlight photos, and linking past posts for trail details.

  1. June 3 – Hamilton Mountain, WA, hike – I love this hike, however challenging (8 miles, 2200 feet), and always feel accomplished to have made the trek again, especially when I get to see the lovely Lewisia flowers on the upper switchbacks.

2. June 10 – Grassy Knoll, WA, hike – Another well loved hike. A bit rainy today, and on the early side for flowers blooming, but so green and lush along the trail!

3. June 17 – Saddle Mountain, OR, hike – We were here last month before the full bloom of the upper meadows, so hiked again on our way to an overnight at the Oregon Coast.

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Saddle and summit

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Pacific Ocean from the summit

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Washington peaks from the summit

4. June 18 – Oregon north coast beaches – We stayed overnight in the Tolvana area of Cannon Beach, with a lovely view of Haystack Rock beyond the parking lots.

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The next day we walked from Arcadia Beach and around Hug Point at low tide, to Big Barnacle Rock. We visited all our favorite landmarks from 30 years of visiting this stretch of beach nearly every summer, often staying for a week when our kids were young. So beautiful!

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The sphinx of Arcadia Beach guards the northern beaches,

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but we are heading south, along these open sands as the tide recedes.

We saw some birds and tide pool creatures:

Next we crossed over the old road carved out of Hug Point, passable at low tide.

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Looking south toward Arch Cape from Big Barnacle Rock – our turnaround point.

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North view, crossing back over Hug Point.

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Walking into the wind, sand rivers pelting our legs.

5. June 22 – Three Corner Rock – Another repeat hike. We were the only ones on the trail today. It was just shady enough in the forest to be comfortable.

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Our big surprise was the profuse bear grass bloom in the upper meadows below the rock. And almost no wind.

Views from near the summit (we didn’t scramble to the upper platform):

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Looking south – Mt Hood and the cell tower, and so much bear grass!

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St Helens, Rainier, Goat Rocks and Adams

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Mt Adams

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Mt St Helens

And a few more flowery views before heading down:

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6. June 30 – Thomas Lake to Rock Lake Mosquito chase – Indian Heaven Wilderness, WA – Why we thought we could out-smart the famous mosquitos of summer in Indian Heaven I do not know, except sometimes you have to find out for your self. Which we did.

There  was plenty of water (mosquito breeding grounds) in Indian Heaven.

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Thomas Lake

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Dee Lake

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Shooting stars, Heather Lake

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Vernal Lake in one of the meadows.

The highest trail section had snow patches, with marsh marigolds and avalanche lilies blooming nearby.

We made it to Rock Lakes, and sat long enough to devour our lunch as quickly as possible, while the mosquitos devoured us through our DEET sprayed clothing.

We had reached our tolerance point, so rushed back down the trail, stopping just long enough to notice Mt St Helens through the trees.

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We learned our lesson! There is not enough DEET in the world to make this a comfortable time in Indian Heaven. We will return in late summer or fall when the mosquitos are gone. 

 

June 2021 – Emerging…but into a heat dome?

It is June 2021 and I am emerging from pandemic life a little more each day, like the cicadas from their seventeen year hibernation, or the Munchkins of Oz after the tornado dropped the house of the Wicked Witch of the East on them. Well not exactly like that. But I am slowly meeting more friends in real life, blinking at the brightness of their unmasked smiles; hesitantly, then greedily leaning into their hugs; ramping up our conversations of all the not shared words of the past fifteen months. Then I go home and recover from the intensity of the interactions, but feel more relaxed, more appreciative of life before the pandemic, when meeting my knitting group and chatting for a few hours was a weekly occurrence; when the warmth of shared interactions was not impeded by a cold glassy screen.

I know the global pandemic is not over, that many places are still locked down and in crisis. People anxiously await their vaccinations, as I did three months ago. People with young children continue sheltering until their vaccines are approved.  But it is time for us to go outside again…

Around town:

We are enjoying berry season! We went on several hikes (see the next post), and also to see the roses.

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June 8 – Portland International Rose Test Garden – We visited during the week when Portland traditionally celebrates the Rose Festival, mostly cancelled this year due to Covid-19. On this showery day, we saw a full rainbow of glistening roses – appropriate for Pride month!

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Knitting :

I have completed two projects – socks, and a donation hat. I have four works in progress: another donation hat, socks, a cardigan and a gnome:

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Kroy socks

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Donation Tam Topper

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WIPs

I also met in person with my knitting group a few times, still outdoors and careful, but no masks as we are all vaccinated. We visited the Knitted Wit Warehouse on her open house day, and I acquired some new yarn. I also got a pile of potential from our knitter’s destash table at one of our meetups. It is so hard to leave beautiful yarn behind, knowing it was all going to donation if not taken home by one of us. So not sure what I am making with these, but I love the colorful potential!

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New skeins

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New to me destash table collection

Quilting :

I finished the baby quilt and sent it along to the new little one.

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What the heck is a heat dome, and why is it lingering around my neighborhood!

At the end of the month, we were challenged again, by the heat dome! A rare meteorological event that produced record high temperatures across the usually mild Pacific Northwest, and once again confined us to our indoor spaces for a few days. Fortunately for me, we have an air conditioned house, but it is not common in Oregon. As the temperatures rose and the air stagnated, I was reminded of my time in Tucson, AZ, when the summer temperatures were commonly above 100 degrees, but not in the 110’s! We are out of it now, but it was uncomfortable, and catastrophic for many. 

We resorted to making popsicles from our ancient Tupperware molds.

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These neighborhood cactus plants were blooming and happy.

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We are hoping for a mild July….

Washington DC, May 20-25, 2021

Last spring (2020) we cancelled a trip to Washington, DC, due to Covid. Our daughter has been working there for two years, and we hadn’t seen her since the 2019 winter holidays. Fully vaccinated, heeding all CDC precautions, and despite predicted high temperatures and a cicada invasion, we finally got to visit her!

May 20 –  Flying, Georgetown

We were able to take the five hour nonstop flight from Portland, Oregon, to National Airport, where our daughter met us.

We stopped in Georgetown for al fresco tacos and a walk along the canal and waterfront.

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C & O Canal, Georgetown

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Georgetown waterfront path, Kennedy Center in the distance.

Then we checked in to our AirB&B lodging in Logan Circle, near our daughter’s apartment.

May 21 – National Mall walk

It was ‘only’ supposed to be 80 degrees today. We went on an 8 mile walk, from Logan Circle, past the White House, the Washington Monument and the Tidal Basin, looking at the monuments along the way.

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Walking toward the White House.

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Looking north at Black Lives Matter Plaza.

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Looking south at Black Lives Matter Plaza.

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Approaching the north side of the White House.

Next stop: the Washington Monument on the National Mall.

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Looking west across the mall toward the Lincoln memorial.

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Our next stop: the Jefferson Memorial, under reconstruction, where we ate our picnic lunch in some nearby shade.

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A blue heron flew across our view as we sat on the grass, admiring reflections in the tidal basin.

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Two official helicopters flew past, as well. According to our daughter, two helicopters means it is the Vice President’s entourage, three for the President. So that might have been Kamala Harris in one of them.

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Inside the Jefferson memorial.

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Looking back as we continued walking around the Tidal Basin.

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The Capitol in the distance, Jefferson’s profile in the monument.

Our next stop was a series of exhibits documenting the legacy of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

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FDR, lifesized, in wheelchair.

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Tributes to the hardships of the Great Depression in the 1930s.

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Panels representing the New Deal Programs that revived the economy.

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FDR and his dog, Fala.

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The amazing First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt also gets an alcove.

Our next stop was the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, new since my only other visit to the capitol in 2008.

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The large granite sculpture of Martin Luther King, Jr. was much larger than I expected, a very fitting tribute to his legacy.

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By now we were feeling the heat, and I had seen most of the memorials in this area on my previous visit, so we continued toward the Lincoln Memorial, which I wanted to see again.

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After crossing Independence Avenue again, we passed by the Korean War Memorial.

The Lincoln Memorial:

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That airplane is probably on the same flight path we were on the previous day.

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President Lincoln

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The Gettysburg Address

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View north from the steps

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Columns

We still had a couple of miles to walk back to our lodging.

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We visited the Viet Nam War Memorial.

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We saw the Federal Reserve building on Constitution Avenue.

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We sipped cold drinks while walking north toward Dupont Circle.

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We caught another glimpse of our Vice President!

After resting from our long walk we enjoyed a takeout Ethiopian dinner.

May 22 – Great Falls National Park

A hot day – into the 90s! We drove about an hour to Great Falls National Park, VA, to see the falls. It was too hot for a serious hike, but we enjoyed the views and some wildlife.

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The very calm Potomac River, above the falls.

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First viewpoint of the Great Falls of the Potomac River

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Downstream from the falls, and a kayaker

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Park map

We walked downstream to a few of the viewpoints:

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We turned around after looking at Mather Gorge:

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Upstream, Mather Gorge

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Downstream, Mather Gorge

As we walked back, keeping to shady paths where possible, we spotted some wildlife:

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Broad-headed skink, sitting on a log near the trail.

I was very excited to see cardinals for the first time, bathing in the nearby creek while we were eating lunch in the shade. They are very hard to photograph!

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Male cardinal

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Female cardinal

Despite the heat, we enjoyed our visit to the natural world so near our nation’s capitol.

May 23 – Cicadas of Baltimore

We saw these everywhere, though they were not particularly dense in DC proper. On Sunday, we were invited to visit cousins who live in a green suburb on the northside of Baltimore. Just opening the car door upon arrival, we got the full impact of the sound of cicadas. This short video by my husband captures the sound.

I added in my few other cicada photos here.

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Cicada carcasses, Lafayette Square

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Cicada ground holes, Great Falls NP

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Pharaoh cicada, National Arboretum

May 24 – Smithsonian National History Museum

We were lucky to get reservations for this newly reopened museum. We looked at inspiring exhibits of American innovation and history for a couple of hours.

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Arriving at the museum entrance after a slightly rainy walk. Good day to be inside.

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Interior views:

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Inventions:

Pop culture:

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Dorothy’s ruby slippers

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Julia Child’s Kitchen

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Bob Ross

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Yankee ticket booth

History of politics and everyday life:

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George Washington’s chair

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Political signs

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Ballot box

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An exhibit on the changing house through time illustrated the rigors of laundry.

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Helen Keller’s watch

I was surprised to find my own neighborhood depicted in the Transportation exhibit.

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I am always on the lookout for interesting textiles, and I found many to admire throughout the exhibits:

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Old quilt top in the lobby

First Lady dresses:

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So many beads!

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Michelle Obama’s dress

Some other old textiles,

and a couple of items that reminded me of my own youth:

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We enjoyed our time in the museum, but after while I could not take in any more. I love knowing this representation of our material life is preserved, and I hope to visit again someday.

May 25 – National Arboretum, flying home

Our last day. We drove to the Union Market for lunch.

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The Union Market is a converted warehouse, now a food court and entertainment center.

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The queen!

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The rooftop has lots of room for dining,

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and views over the city.

We then wandered around a bit at the National Arboretum.

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Repurposed columns from the U.S. Capitol building stand out on a hill in the center of the arboretum.

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The National herb garden had some pretty blooms:

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It was too hot to go far, but we enjoyed our last day with our daughter.

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Our flight home was mostly above clouds until we saw Mt Hood peeking through.

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This was a wonderful trip, reuniting with our daughter and getting a flavor for her life in DC. And testing the waters for traveling again in the post-vaccination world. We are looking forward to more adventures as the world opens up, however slowly.

May 2021, part 3: Hiking

Three significant hikes:

May 5 – Weldon Wagon Road, WA

We returned to this favorite trail while the balsamroot were fresh, and the later season flowers were just beginning to bloom.

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Open slopes of balsamroot along the upper trail.

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Mt Hood view from the open trail.

Late season flowers:

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Old plow at the turnaround.

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Second growth firs viewed through oak trees.

May 11 – Saddle Mountain, OR

Another favorite trail – this time we were early for the full bloom, and saw fawn lilies in the upper saddle.

The alder trees in the lower forest had not leafed out yet. We made our way up to the prominent knob, admiring lots of early flowers in the alternating woods and open slopes.

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Alder trees

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The knob, and first view to the ocean.

Some of the early flowers:

Lilies along the first summit before the saddle:

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Glacier lilies

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Pink fawn lilies

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View to the saddle and summit.

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Prairie fire in the upper meadows.

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Lewisia foliage – too early for flowers.

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View of three Cascade peaks from the summit.

May 28 – Ridge Trail, Forest Park, Portland

This was our first time hiking the Ridge Trail in Forest Park.

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This trail has an excellent view of the iconic 1930’s St Johns Bridge, over the Willamette River. 

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The trail ascends 1000 feet from the start near the St Johns Bridge in North Portland, to the intersection with Firelane 7. We continued the loop on Firelane 7, the Wildwood Trail, and Leif Erickson Drive, before returning on the lower Ridge Trail for a total distance of 4.25 miles. Most of the time we were in the forest.

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Through the woods…

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Vine maples

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Mushroom

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Late trillium

We stopped to admire the bridge again on our return trip – sky a little bluer than when we began.

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My next and last May 2021 post will be about our wonderful first post-Covid-vaccination trip to visit our daughter, in Washington DC.

May 2021, part 2: Garden, Knitting, Sewing

My garden:

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Native irises

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First roses

Our tomato plants are doing well – next we will add a few basil plants.

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Walking in Portland:

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California poppies

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Same poppies on a cloudy day.

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Meadow rue and allium

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Colorful landscaping

And in the “weird” Portland spirit:

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Fairy garden

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Sidewalk interactive music box display

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Mannequin arms on Yogurt Shop bench

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First local Hood strawberries! (Not weird)

Knitting and sewing:

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I am making progress on my bamboo Em Dash cardigan.

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I’ve finished all of the parts of the albatross – assembly next.

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I am close to finished with the red/brown socks. 

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I started these green socks for travel knitting, made good progress on our DC trip. But I lost at yarn chicken. 

The pinwheel quilt for a new baby in the family is basted and ready for quilting:

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I used this opportunity to knit Egg to Turtle for the big sister. I have had my eye on this Susan B Anderson pattern for a while, and enjoyed the opportunity to make it for someone.

I refreshed my mask supply for our flight to DC and travels there:

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I have some garment sewing patterns queued up for stitching. I’ve been using my Jane Austen pattern weights:

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And in other crafty news, my knitting group is planning a Big Hug-Show and Tell Back Yard Party later this month, after we are all fully vaccinated. It will be great to share all our knitting projects that we have only seen over ZOOM.