Three Fall Hikes near Mt Adams, WA Oct. 6-8, 2021

We stayed two nights in Trout Lake, Washington, to be closer to some far flung trailheads in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The distance may not be far, in miles, but the nature of the roads requires slow and patient driving. The trails were beautiful, in their fall colors, despite a a bit of rain and early snow.

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Trail location map

Lewis River Falls – October 6th

Knowing it would probably rain, we chose a waterfall hike through the forest. This area is extremely popular in summer. However, on this rainy fall day, we had the trail entirely to ourselves beyond the Lower Falls Overlooks near the campground.

Lower Falls: We looked from above, then from one of the downstream side trails.

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Lower Falls from the overlook

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Closer view of the holes in the rocky platform

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Fallen leaves near the downstream viewpoint

The Lower Falls were mesmerizing:

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Lower Lewis River Falls

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We walked back upstream along the Lewis River for about three miles, toward the Upper Falls. We passed the Lower Falls again:

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Lower Falls with a bit of fall color

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We found a beach during a pause in the rain for our lunch break.

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Lunch rock

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Rock hopper nearby

We continued upstream to the Middle Falls:

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Rainy trail – the trees sheltered us much of the time.

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Middle Lewis River Falls

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The main channel cuts into the rocky bench below the falls.

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We passed Copper Creek Falls, a tributary to the Lewis River:

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Copper Creek Falls

We paused for a rest at the Upper Falls lower viewpoint:

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Upper Lewis River Falls

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From here we turned back, retracing our steps through the woods, quite satisfied that we have seen most of the Lewis River Falls.

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We drove on various Gifford Pinchot National Forest roads to our lodging in Trout Lake. These roads were very slow going, shifting from paved to gravel and extremely potholed!

Killen Creek Meadows, Mt Adams – October 7th

We woke to a glorious blue sky day! The mountain was out, and we looked forward to our hike to Killen Creek Meadows on the northwest flanks of Mt Adams.

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Mt Adams from Trout Lake

The Killen Creek Meadows to High Camp trail begins in the forest, then emerges into tiers of meadows. We started at about 4500 feet elevation, ascending to about 6000 feet on the 12,281 foot tall stratovolcano.

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Lots of red huckleberry bushes along the trail.

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Fresh snow from yesterday’s storm began at about 5200 feet.

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In one forest opening we could see Mt Rainier to the north.

The open meadows provide great views of Mt Adams:

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We reached the junction of the Pacific Crest Trail and the High Camp trail at lunch time, after hiking 3.5 miles. The snow was getting deeper, so we decided this would be our turnaround point. We did meet one northbound hiker, Tortoise, while we rested there.

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Trail junction/lunch stop

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High Camp is somewhere up on this ridge

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Sparkling snow

We made our way back, admiring the views and the foliage.

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Clouds forming in the afternoon

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Huckleberries in the snow

Killen Creek Meadows are known for summer wildflowers, and we plan to return for a future summer adventure.

Takhlakh Lake is not far from the Killen Creek Trailhead. We stopped by for the iconic view on our way back to Trout Lake.

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Mt Adams from Takhlakh Lake

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Glacier close ups

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Northern flank

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An ice cave?

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Adams Glacier

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Hummocky topography on the south flank

Bird Mountain Loop, Indian Heaven Wilderness – October 8th

We chose this hike on the northeast side of Indian Heaven Wilderness for our last day. Clouds were coming in, but we had excellent conditions for seeing lots of lovely fall foliage around the meadows and lakes. The trail begins in the forest, and heads up hill to the flanks of Bird Mountain.

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Once again, our trail leads through red huckleberry foliage.

From the shoulder of Bird Mountain, we got views of surrounding peaks, near and far.

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Mt Adams to the east

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Goat Rocks to the northeast

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Sawtooth Mtn, with Mt Rainier in the distance

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Scree slope beneath Bird Mountain, near our return trail this afternoon.

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Continuing south, we would pass near Lemei Rock.

Beautiful foliage, mushrooms, small lakes appeared in the meadows along our trail.

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Mountain Ash

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Small lake

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Mushroom

We stopped by this small unnamed lake to eat lunch and admire the reflections and colors.

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We took the side trail to Deep Lake, passing the Cultus Lake outlet on the way.

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Cultus Lake from the Deep Lake Trail

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Deep Lake

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Back on the main trail, we passed Cultus Lake before taking the junction toward the Pacific Crest Trail and Clear Lake.

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Cultus Lake

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Clear Lake

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Back on the Pacific Crest Trail, northbound

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One of the scree slopes on the west side of Bird Mountain.

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Another unnamed lake by the trail.

We crossed back over the northern shoulder of Bird Mountain, where we could see some views again, before descending through the scree slopes back to the trailhead. Lots of late blooming flowers and seedheads in this area.

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Sawtooth Mountain, from Bird Mountain

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Mt Adams

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Descending the scree slope – rougher trail in here

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Seedheads

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The very last lupine of summer.

This was a very successful trip – three new trails for us, and more added to our list for the future. We’d hiked more than 22 miles, and 4000 feet elevation, and fully immersed ourselves in the autumn foliage.

What happened in September 2021…

Home and garden:

Knitting:

I finished more hats for the Women’s Shelter donation, made progress on socks and a shawl, both excellent travel knitting, and began knitting the fall Mystery Gnome. And I received a late but welcome crocheted bag as a birthday gift from my sister.

Hiking:

We spent a lot of time on hiking trails! In addition to two out of town trips to the Olympic Peninsula and Mt Baker, and a day hike at Cloud Cap on Mt Hood, all described in separate posts, we went on six other adventures:

September 9, East Crater Trail, Indian Heaven, Washington. Return to Junction Lake.

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Into the woods

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East Crater

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Junction Lake

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Mountain ash

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Huckleberry

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Mt St Helens from the PCT Southbound

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Birds in a water hole in a mostly dry creek

September 17, Portland Arboretum. Early fall color on a beautiful day.

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Aralia

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Sumac

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Hop hornbeam

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Douglas fir with sap

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September 24, Kiwa Trail, Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Washington. Looking for Sandhill Cranes while we can still hike the trail before it is closed for the winter nesting season.

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Nightshade berries near the creek

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Woodland

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Grassland with teasel

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These are the sandhill cranes we are looking for!

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Resident nesting pair with colt

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September 26 – Saltzman Road in Forest Park, Portland. Our first time on this particular trail through the park, we walked 6 miles while catching up with friends.

September 28, Crawford Oaks, Washington. A return to an oft hiked trail, we escaped the rain in Portland and saw only 4 other hikers the entire day.

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Columbia Hills from The Dalles Bridge

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Geologic context

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Eight Miles Falls

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Pear tree

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Our usual lunch spot

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Clouds and wind

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Eastward

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Tufts

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The “one tree”

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Dried balsamroot, Dalles Mountain Ranch

Some foliage for the day:

September 30, Coyote Wall, Washington. Another often hiked trail, again with friends. A beautiful day up there!

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Puffy clouds and rocks

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Coyote Wall

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Mt Hood in the clouds

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Return hike

Other news:

Tiaki, the Albatross chick I have been watching in New Zealand via webcam, has fledged!

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The blue line is a tracker on Tiaki, the red line is one of her parents.

A family member acquired a new-to-him car.

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I attended an in-person book group meeting, where we watched the moon rise over the Willamette River from Sauvie Island.

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Six Hikes in June, 2021

We had six hiking days in June, all repeat hikes, so I am showing just a few highlight photos, and linking past posts for trail details.

  1. June 3 – Hamilton Mountain, WA, hike – I love this hike, however challenging (8 miles, 2200 feet), and always feel accomplished to have made the trek again, especially when I get to see the lovely Lewisia flowers on the upper switchbacks.

2. June 10 – Grassy Knoll, WA, hike – Another well loved hike. A bit rainy today, and on the early side for flowers blooming, but so green and lush along the trail!

3. June 17 – Saddle Mountain, OR, hike – We were here last month before the full bloom of the upper meadows, so hiked again on our way to an overnight at the Oregon Coast.

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Saddle and summit

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Pacific Ocean from the summit

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Washington peaks from the summit

4. June 18 – Oregon north coast beaches – We stayed overnight in the Tolvana area of Cannon Beach, with a lovely view of Haystack Rock beyond the parking lots.

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The next day we walked from Arcadia Beach and around Hug Point at low tide, to Big Barnacle Rock. We visited all our favorite landmarks from 30 years of visiting this stretch of beach nearly every summer, often staying for a week when our kids were young. So beautiful!

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The sphinx of Arcadia Beach guards the northern beaches,

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but we are heading south, along these open sands as the tide recedes.

We saw some birds and tide pool creatures:

Next we crossed over the old road carved out of Hug Point, passable at low tide.

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Looking south toward Arch Cape from Big Barnacle Rock – our turnaround point.

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North view, crossing back over Hug Point.

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Walking into the wind, sand rivers pelting our legs.

5. June 22 – Three Corner Rock – Another repeat hike. We were the only ones on the trail today. It was just shady enough in the forest to be comfortable.

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Our big surprise was the profuse bear grass bloom in the upper meadows below the rock. And almost no wind.

Views from near the summit (we didn’t scramble to the upper platform):

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Looking south – Mt Hood and the cell tower, and so much bear grass!

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St Helens, Rainier, Goat Rocks and Adams

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Mt Adams

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Mt St Helens

And a few more flowery views before heading down:

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6. June 30 – Thomas Lake to Rock Lake Mosquito chase – Indian Heaven Wilderness, WA – Why we thought we could out-smart the famous mosquitos of summer in Indian Heaven I do not know, except sometimes you have to find out for your self. Which we did.

There  was plenty of water (mosquito breeding grounds) in Indian Heaven.

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Thomas Lake

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Dee Lake

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Shooting stars, Heather Lake

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Vernal Lake in one of the meadows.

The highest trail section had snow patches, with marsh marigolds and avalanche lilies blooming nearby.

We made it to Rock Lakes, and sat long enough to devour our lunch as quickly as possible, while the mosquitos devoured us through our DEET sprayed clothing.

We had reached our tolerance point, so rushed back down the trail, stopping just long enough to notice Mt St Helens through the trees.

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We learned our lesson! There is not enough DEET in the world to make this a comfortable time in Indian Heaven. We will return in late summer or fall when the mosquitos are gone. 

 

Eleven Lakes and a bear in Indian Heaven Wilderness, and more pandemic knitting

We took two hikes in Indian Heaven Wilderness, a beautiful patch of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest between Mt Adams and Mt St Helens in southern Washington. A few small volcanic peaks rise above the rolling forested landscape that is also spotted with dozens of lakes, and covered with ripe huckleberry bushes in August.

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August 20, 2020 – Indian Racetrack Lake and Red Mountain

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Trailhead into the forest

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Racetrack Lake – the only lake on this hike

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Looking Across Racetrack Meadow to Red Mountain

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View of Mt Adams on the way up to Red Mountain

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Closer view of Mt Adams,

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And closer.

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Nearing the top of Red Mountain

Views from the top:
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Mt Hood beyond Red Mountain Lookout

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We climbed up to the viewing platform on the lookout.

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Some other hikers pointed out a bear cub down on the other side of the mountain, eating huckleberries.

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Looking back east at Mt Adams – clouds now covering the top

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Mt St Helens to the north

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And starting down again, we can see our trail dropping into the woods, and beyond we see the spine of Indian Heaven Wilderness: Berry Mountain, Gifford Peak, burned East Crater, and Lemei Rock.

Some details along the trail:
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Lily pads and grass, Racetrack Lake

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Falls Creek

Hike #57, 6.8 miles, 1500 feet

August 28, 2020 – Thomas Lake trailhead to Junction Lake

The other ten lakes were seen on this hike.

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Once again we enter the forested wilderness…

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Thomas Lake

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Heather Lake

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Dee Lake

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Eunice Lake

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Nuha Lake

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Rock Lakes

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Unnamed lake beyond Rock Lakes

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View of burnt East Crater from the Old Cascade Crest trail segment

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A glimpse of Mt St Helens as we cross the shoulder of East Crater

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Unnamed lake near the trail junction

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Junction Lake, our turnaround point

Some details along the trail:
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Reflections in the lakes…

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Huckleberry bushes turning red

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Mountain ash berries

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Hellebore

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Most likely the last beargrass bloom of summer

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And another view of Mt St Helens above Eunice Lake on the descent.

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Hike #58, 6.8 miles, 630 feet.

Meanwhile, we are floating along through more days of pandemia – some days we see no one at all, only virtual connections to the outside world. Our neighbors leave us tomatoes. We leave them apples and plums and wave across the rose bushes. Downtown is still burning up with civil unrest while I go on placidly through the days of late summer, of pandemia, of this administration… I virtually hold my breath, knock on wood, pray, cast spells, wish for a begin to a return to ‘normalcy’; hope for a late summer without a local fire season, hope for a scientifically tested efficacious vaccine, and hope for a fair election that will allow us to emerge from impending climate change, covid and facism. And I knit…

Knitting –

I cast on a hat and some socks…

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Rafa by Joji Locatelli, Malabrigo Arroyo, Blue green

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Sock, Berroco Sox yarn

Neighborhood sights:

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fern shadows

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Poetry Post

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yard sign

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neighborly tomatoes

And nationally…

My daughter attended the 57th March on Washington,

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The march

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Lincoln Memorial

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The Mall

-and this artwork crossed my social media feed:

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I am still struggling a bit with the new WordPress format….

Wildflower Rainbows along the trails during Pride month; some knitting, and neighborhood views –

Friday, June 19, 2020, Grassy Knoll, Washington

Wildflower meadows filled the open slopes near the trailhead.

White dogwood, lilies and anemones led us through the shady forest up the steep trail to the ridge crest.

More flowers all the way to the top of Grassy Knoll, and beyond.

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Pink cliff penstemons along the rocky ridge, Mt Adams beyond.

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Grassy Knoll looks green from here,

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but the green slopes are full of flowers!

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Summit view toward Mt Hood.

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Summit view toward Mt Adams.

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Continuing up the ridge, Mt Hood, the Columbia River, and more wildflower meadows.

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And more blooming meadows near our turnaround point.

Every color of wildflower was in bloom today!

It was a great day in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. (Hike #46, 6.2 miles, 1350 feet.)

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Tuesday, June 23, 2020, Chinidere Mountain, Oregon

We saw many of the same flowers that we saw at Grassy Knoll, though we were a thousand feet higher in altitude, so earlier in the bloom season. (Hike #47, 7.5 miles, 1450 feet.)

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Wahtum Lake, near the trailhead.

A few early season flowers still in bloom here:

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Ascending into the rainbow meadows on Chinidere Mountain.

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Mt St Helens, Mt Rainier, and Mt Adams from the summit.

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Mt Hood and Mt Jefferson from the summit.

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Wahtum Lake and Mt Hood.

A highlight was walking north of Chinidere Mountain on the Pacific Crest Trail, into the upper margin of the 2017 burn zone. Beargrass blooms sparkled in the recovering forest.

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Wahtum ‘Express’ back to the parking area.

Knitting

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Finished mitts.

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A nearly finished Meris cardigan – still have to sew on the buttons.

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Sock progress.

Around the neighborhood:

Black Lives Matter signs blooming everywhere, along with summer flowers.

And more action nationally…

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Hiking to St Helens Lake / A Peek at Beatlemania and Halloween in Portland

St Helen’s Lake, Sunday, October 27, 2019

We hiked from Johnson Ridge Observatory in Mt St Helens National Volcanic Monument to the St Helens Lake overlook for stunning 360 degree views.  It was cold, but not too windy.

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From the trailhead, Coldwater Peak is the highest point in view. St Helens Lake is tucked behind the ridgeline on the right, behind the arch.

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Frost along the trail,

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and Mt St Helens, herself.

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Nearing our destination, nice view of Mt Adams and Spirit Lake.

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One last ridge to traverse.

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Lunch view and turnaround point – St Helens Lake. Mt Rainier, about 40 miles away, peeking over the ridgeline of the Mt Margaret backcountry.

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Zooming in on Mt Rainier,

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the Goat Rocks,

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Spirit Lake, the silhouette of Mt Hood, and Mt St Helens, with Harry’s Ridge in the foreground.

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One last look at St Helens Lake before heading down.

This entire area is off limits to off trail exploring, so there is no trail to the lakeshore. Before the 1980 eruption, the bare slopes were covered with soil and forest. New plants are growing, but the relic tree stumps and log rafts remain as they were after the blast.

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Closer view of the 39.5 year old log rafts.

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Zooming in on the dome and glacier in Mt St Helen’s crater.

We hiked partway up Harry’s Ridge on the return.

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Another view of Spirit Lake and Mt Adams from Harry’s Ridge.

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And a last look at Mt St Helens in afternoon light.

Some details:

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We met a birder on the return trip who was very excited to have spotted this Northern Pygmy Owl on a fir tree. Nice display of tree stumps and blast-oriented logs in the background.

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Northern pygmy owl.

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A few very late wild strawberry blooms along the trail, nestled into the pumice..

SCREEN SHOT 2019-11-03 AT 11.53.50 AM

(Hike #50, 10 miles, 2300 feet)

Downtown Portland

I met a friend at the Portland Historical Society Museum to see a photo exhibit about the making of flax into linen in the 1930s. It was fascinating, but not photogenic. I popped in to see an exhibit celebrating The Beatles’ 1965 concert in Portland. I was a preteen when the Beatles invaded, but my older sister swept us into fandom with her enthusiasm, and their music is timeless. My own children have had their Beatle years. We visited Abbey Road in London, and then went on the Magical Mystery Tour and to the Beatles Museum in Liverpool during our UK trip in 2011. It was fun to see a little slice of Beatlemania in PDX.

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We had plenty of Beatle magazines and trading cards at my house, but not this game. It’s funny now to think how shockingly long their hair was considered- it looks pretty clean cut by today’s standards.

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It was a gorgeous fall day in downtown Portland.

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Oregon Historical Society Museum

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First Congregational Church

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Central Library

Neighborhood Witches and more:

There are many elaborate halloween decorations in my neighborhood to enjoy while out walking and admiring the beautiful fall colors on the day before Halloween.

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The light was just right to bring out the face on this tree.

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Eagle and salmon carved from a cedar that had to be removed.

 

 

 

Two wildlife refuges, Indian Heaven, and trying to keep up with fall colors, Sept-Oct 2019

It has been a busy couple of weeks – a quilt show, a fiber festival, hikes at two wildlife refuges and Indian Heaven Wilderness. Meanwhile, the Mac hard drive is off at the Genius repair shop. I am learning blog work-arounds via iPad.

Friday, September 27 – I attended the Northwest Quilt Expo, admired all the quilts and photographed many. This vintage Tile Friendship Quilt (circa 1900, maker unknown) from the Latimer Quilt Museum, was very interesting. Seemingly random shapes are appliquéd to a plain background, each signed by a different maker in true Friendship Quilt style. It looks very modern, but it is old and entirely hand stitched!

I bought a few fat eighths to add to a batik quilt in my mental UFO list.

Sunday, September 29 -I visited the Oregon Flock and Fiber Festival in Canby, Oregon, just long enough to buy a lighter weight spindle and more fiber to practice drop spinning.

Then we went to the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, our first visit there, and walked around the perimeter. Not many birds have arrived yet, but there are great overlooks and a nice winter trail for future visits. (Hike#44, 3.6 miles)

Great Blue Heron

Hawthorne berries

Looking across the refuge – soon this will be flooded with water and birds.

Great Blue Heron on the return trail.

Saturday, October 5 – We went to the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge in Washington during their season closing bird fest. We walked the Kiwa Trail and part of the newly opened Carty Lake trail, and also went inside the Chinook Plankhouse to look around. (Hike#45, 3.2 miles)

Turtles

Sand Hill Cranes

Sand Hill Cranes in flight.

Great Horned Owl

Carty Lake

Chinook plank house

Inside the plankhouse.

Chinook Salmon trap

Sunday, October 6 – We joined friends for a hike in Indian Heaven Wilderness – from the East Crater trailhead to Junction and Lemei Lakes. Late fall colors, thawed mushrooms and blueberries, very pretty. (Hike#46, 8.8 miles, 1000 feet)

East Crater beyond one of many small lakes along the trail.

Junction Lake

Lemei Rock

Lemei Lake

Neighborhood walks – Meanwhile, in Northeast Portland, the days grow shorter, the light angles lower, the leaves more colorful.

Katsura trees

Sumac

Neighborhood witches hunting…

More witches…

Ash trees reflected in nearby windows.

Rain chain shadows

Knitting – I am making progress on my Meris cardigan….

Someone turned on the waterfall! June Lake and Chocolate Falls, Mt St Helens, July 4th, 2019

We went with good friends to the June Lake Trail northeast of Cougar, Washington, on the south side of Mt St Helens. Image 7-4-19 at 10.33 PMThe walk to the lake is easy, with flowers blooming along the way, and magical mirror reflections at the lake.

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June Lake

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Mirror reflections

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View to the waterfall across the lake.

In February 2016 we snowshoed to this spot – a couple of comparison look back views:

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June Lake and waterfall, July 4, 2019

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June Lake and waterfall, February 20, 2016

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July 2019

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February 2016

Today we continued beyond June Lake, up a steep ridge, to the Loowit (around the mountain) Trail, and walked east for a ways.

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Beargrass blooming at the edge of a lava flow along the trail.

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Large trees

We turned back west to visit the elusive Chocolate Falls. Our well traveled companion had never ‘seen’ the waterfall, although he had been there a few times. We arrived at the horseshoe shaped cliff, but there was no waterfall.

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Dry lip of Chocolate Falls, 2:44 pm.

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The waterfall is now “on”, 2:46 pm.

Then some nearby hikers noticed water beginning to flow in the channel above the cliff, and lo and behold, a couple of minutes later, water was plunging over the cliff through a well-worn, polished slot in the cliff edge.

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Looking upstream at the channel.

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Narrow but steady stream of Chocolate Falls

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Looking down at the polished slot at the lip of Chocolate Falls.

The snow fields on the mountain above had warmed enough to send fresh meltwater down the channel. Apparently this is a documented phenomenon here. To us it was a surprise, like a rainbow or a special wildlife sighting – a serendipitous moment of grace and beauty.

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Mt St Helens remained slightly cloud covered, with partial views. The temperature was perfect. Our plan to take the loop trail back to June Lake for the return hike also offered a ‘surprise’. This connector trail is really only a good option in the winter, on snowshoes or skis, when the lava flow boulderfields are snow covered. It took us almost an hour to navigate the half mile connecting trail, and we were very happy not to have twisted an ankle or knee in the process.

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Picking our way across the lava flow.

The unexpected elements, the waterfall and the boulder field, added to our adventures on a day suited to celebrating our nation’s commitment to protecting our wilderness areas! (Hike #30, 7.5 miles, 1500 feet)

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Mt St Helens from the south.

New or notable wildflowers today:

Knitting:

I have seamed and added the top edging to Le Petit Sac, and knit the icord strap.

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Trapper Creek Wilderness, WA (18-46)

October 20, 2018 – Observation Peak and Sister Rocks

We hiked up and down this roller coaster trail, through autumn light and sun, to viewpoints of the surrounding Cascade mountain peaks rising above a bluish haze.

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7 miles, 1575 feet (#58)

Driving to the trailhead on Dry Creek Road we passed through a tunnel of yellow trees.

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View through the front windshield…

Bunchberry and huckleberry along the trail provided some color.

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At the top of the first ridge, the views from the rocky outcrop are to Mt Rainier and Mt Adams.

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Mt Rainier

We then took the side trail to Sister Rocks, with a great view of Mt St Helens and Mt Hood. Lunch stop.

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Dan atop Sister Rock; Soda Peaks on the left.

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My shadow and Mt St Helens

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Closer view

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Mt Hood

The intermediate high point on the Sister Rocks spur provides an excellent view of Mt Adams.

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Mt Adams

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Returning to the main trail, we headed down hill, then back up to the views from Observation Peak of four tall volcanoes rising above the forested landscape.

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Mt St Helens, Mt Rainier, and Mt Adams from Observation Peak.

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Mt St Helens and the Mt Margaret backcountry

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Mt Rainier

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Mt Adams

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Mt Hood

As we departed Observation Peak I spotted what may be the last blooming aster of the year.

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Mirror Lake

The lake is at the base of Vista Point in Rooster Rock State Park. As we drive through the Columbia River Gorge on I-84 we sometimes see swans here in winter. This morning, no swans, but the fog was lifting poetically, so we stopped to look at the light.

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Knitting

Another dishcloth finished, and I frogged and am reknitting the front of the Ivy Lace Cardigan.

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Falls Creek Falls (18-42)

Falls Creek Falls Trail, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, WA     9/29/2018    (#54)

This trail provides fall foliage along Falls Creek, and an impressive waterfall at the terminus.

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Colorful vine maples at the trailhead

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Into the woods

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Over the first bridge

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Along the creek

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Over the upper bridge

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Around this turn we hear the falls

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Then look up and see the upper falls

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Middle and lower tiers (about 225 feet high) of Falls Creek Falls viewed from the end of the trail.

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Lower plunge pool

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Downstream view

After eating our lunch, we returned back down the trail,

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Through the vine maple corridor

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Under the big leaf maple canopy

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With a pause by the stream

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And another pause near the trailhead to play with the impressionistic reflections…

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We saw a variety of leaf displays…

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Vine maple – green

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Vine maple – turning orange

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Vine maple – orange

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Solomon seal, with berries

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Vine maple – red

My new identification for the day was Pacific dogwood without the distinctive white flowers. In the fall it has red leaves and red seed pod clusters.

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About 4 miles round trip and 800 feet.

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CRAFTING

I have made knitting progress on my Ivy Lace Cardigan and a round dishcloth.

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