Return to Mirror Lake and beyond…

9/12/2019  Mirror Lake and Tom Dick and Harry Mountain, Mt Hood, Oregon

Our first time on the rerouted trail to Mirror Lake – the trail is slightly longer than before, but not as steep, and crosses several small streams on new bridges.

DSC03764DSC03767

Mirror Lake was popular on this not quite fall day.

DSC03689

Tom Dick and Harry Mountain beyond Mirror Lake.

DSC03696

Mt Hood reflected in Mirror lake.

We continued to the top of Tom Dick and Harry Mountain, and enjoyed clear views of the Cascades north and south while eating our lunch.

DSC03700

IMG_2747

Mt Hood and Mirror Lake from Tom Dick and Harry summit.

dsc03716.jpg

Mt Jefferson to the south.

DSC03724

Panorama – St Helens, Rainier and Adams to the left of Mt Hood.

DSC03731

Late summer glaciers of Mt Hood.

DSC03743

Mt Hood in view on the descent.

There were a few scrappy wildflower blooms hanging on to their petals, and tinges of autumn on the vine maples and huckleberries.

Hike #43, 7.4 miles, 1600 feet.

Knitting

I pulled this sweater yarn out of the hibernating pile, measured and swatched a bit, and recast on….we’ll see how it goes.

DSC04303

Back to the sky/some sewing

8/31/2019 Cloud Cap/Timberline Trail High Point

We returned with friends to this same trail near Cooper Spur on Mt Hood that we hiked in July. Fewer flowers, less snow, still the sky, the swirling cloud cap, the views afar, the plans formulating to complete the Timberline Trail loop someday. Hike #42, 6 miles, 1650 feet.

DSC03666

Once attaining the crest of the East Eliot Moraine, the Washington Cascade Peaks are on view to the north,

DSC03663

and Mt Hood is ahead to the west.

DSC03671

Low growing buckwheat, lupine and yarrow.

DSC03672

Later in the day, clouds forming on the mountain, knotweed in the foreground showing fall colors already.

DSC03676

My hiking companions resting near the Timberline Trail high point.

DSC03681

And, almost back to the trailhead, high desert beyond.

Lookback: A couple of photos comparing snow levels with mid-July:

DSC03662

View up the Eliot today, 8/31/2019.

DSC02043

View up the Eliot seven weeks ago, July 12, 2019

DSC03677

View to the south, toward Lamberson Butte and the Timberline Trail crossings, today.

DSC02143

Similar view seven weeks ago.

Some sewing

DSC03659

Two pairs of sleep shorts.

And a random Portlandia street art scene:

IMG_2681

 

 

 

 

Late summer Gentians at Chinidere Mountain, Oregon

8/23/2019  Chinidere Mountain hike

The trail leads down to Wahtum Lake,

DSC03524DSC03533DSC03539

DSC03537

Chinidere Mountain, our destination, on the skyline.

DSC03548

Endemic cutleaf bugbane blooming along the lake trail.

DSC03554

After crossing the log bridge at the lake outlet, our trail leads steeply up hill, eventually reaching the top of Chinidere Mountain, with views of five Cascade volcanoes.

DSC03598

Mt Hood to the south,

DSC03593

and Mt Jefferson on the horizon just to the right.

DSC03592

Mt St Helens, Mt Rainier, and Mt Adams to the north.

DSC03596

The burned drainage of Eagle Creek, with Mt St Helens on the far right.

DSC03599

Wahtum Lake below us to the east.

I was pleased to find many patches of Explorer’s gentian blooming along the trail and at the top of the mountain.

DSC03568

Explorer’s gentian

DSC03620DSC03617

DSC03585

Previous hikes here earlier in the season had a different suite of flowers. Today we saw the later season flowers and berries: 

Other new and notable flowers:

Berries of late summer:

We found plenty of ripe huckleberries to supplement our lunch. We saw a few north and south bound PCT through-hikers, but not many other people on the trail today. It was a fairly perfect late summer hike.

Image 8-23-19 at 5.42 PM

Hike #41, 5 miles, 1200 feet

Spinning

I finished plying the last of my Tour de Fleece yarn. I am planning to try Easter Egg dye on this yarn – stay tuned for updates.

DSC03523

Signs of Fall in the neighborhood

Finally some knitting! And two new hikes…

Flyway Twist Shawl

This shawl has been delivered to it’s recipient, so I am happy to share the pictures! The solid yarn is Malabrigo Sock in the Reflecting Pool colorway. The real star of the show is the Fully Spun colorful gradient called ‘Voices in My Head’. It was fascinating to knit with the gradient, watching the colors emerge and play against the teal backdrop. The brioche section in the middle adds variety to both the look and the knitting experience. The pattern is by Veera Valimaki, and is easily obtained on Ravelry.

DSC03297DSC03314DSC03316

Salmon River Trail 8/12/2019

We hiked with friends on a flat easy trail where we could enjoy a shady beautiful setting with lots of time to chat. This was my first time hiking this trail, near Welches on Mt Hood, and I can see why it is often recommended.

DSC03253

Salmon River from the trail.

Image 8-16-19 at 6.17 PM

Hike #39 – 4 miles/200 feet

Cheater hike on the Timberline Trail, Mt Hood Meadows 8/15/2019

I would like to walk all of the 40 mile Timberline Trail around Mt Hood. This is a section I hadn’t done yet.  We rode the Mt Hood Meadows chair lift up 700 feet of elevation (thus, cheating) then began walking north along the trail, as far as Clark Creek. Beautiful flowers, creek crossings and wildflower meadows along the way.

DSC03335

Our cheating enabler – the Stadium Lift

DSC03346

Looking back as we silently rise – Mt Jefferson and a hint of the Sisters.

DSC03350

Aster and goldenrod meadows along the Timberline Trail.

DSC03377

Several small, easily crossed creeks along the trail.

DSC03436DSC03357DSC03411

We eventually reached views of ‘Pea Gravel Ridge’, a glacial moraine just beyond Clark Creek.

DSC03431

Pea Gravel Ridge

DSC03405

Downstream view of a branch of Clark Creek.

DSC03390

Upstream view toward a waterfall on Clark Creek.

DSC03404

DSC03398

Mt Hood, summer view

DSC03401

Glaciers

DSC03434

We then retraced our steps and walked south along the Timberline Trail until it began to descend through the woods to the White River crossing – we’ll save that for another day. We passed through beautiful meadows, under ever-present ski infrastructure and views of the mountain. We walked the mile and a half and 700 feet down to the trailhead instead of going back to the chairlift, so we only ‘cheated’ one way.

DSC03422

Clark Creek

 

DSC03451

Asters, paintbrush, goldenrod, false hellebore, with ski lift.

DSC03437

Mt Jefferson, and a very hazy view of the Three Sisters from the trail.

DSC03460

DSC03481

Tall cotton grass, aptly named, in this moist meadow.

DSC03506

The Timberline Trail continues down through the forest to White River, but we turned back.

Image 8-15-19 at 11.10 PM

GPS track (with some wandering points). Hike #40, 6 miles/1000 feet.

New or notable flowers:

View from the Sternwheeler Columbia Gorge

8/4/2019  A two hour cruise

With the Friends of the Gorge, from Cascade Locks, east to Wind River, then west to Bonneville Dam.

DSC02353

Our vessel

Hot day, river surface like glass – not enough wind for the kiters and surfers this morning, but enough of a breeze to enjoy the wide views from the top deck of the boat.

IMG_2552

Ready to embark – Cascade Locks and Bridge of the Gods in view.

DSC02354

Table Mountain reflected in the glassy Columbia River.

DSC02364

Eagle nest on a buoy.

DSC02369

Eastern turnaround at Wind Mountain.

DSC02380

Downriver toward Hamilton and Table Mountains.

DSC02401

Bridge of the Gods, burned forest on the skyline.

Passing under the Bridge of the Gods – shadows and angles.

DSC02408DSC02410DSC02415DSC02417DSC02420

Western turnaround above Bonneville Dam:

DSC02434

DSC02431

Beacon Rock beyond the powerhouse.

Back under the Bridge of the Gods to port.

DSC02468DSC02471DSC02480DSC02490

A lovely morning on the river.

Knitting

Some very long rows ahead to finish this gift:

IMG_2553 (1)

Revisiting haunted trees on Vista Ridge, and winning the Tour de Fleece

Vista Ridge to Wy’East Basin on Mt Hood, July 25, 2019

We like to hike Vista Ridge on the north side of Mt Hood at least once a year. I posted previous reports from 2017 in June before full snow melt, 2017 in August, and 2018 in August.

Today was hot going through the burned trees, but I found a few old and new ghost friends along the way:

Eventually we made it to the blooming alpine meadows of Wy’East basin.

DSC02260

Barrett Spur and Mt Hood

DSC02276

Looking north toward Mts Rainier and Adams

DSC02277DSC02281DSC02320

After lunch we continued hiking above the basin to a remnant snowfield, and a view over to the other side of the mountain.

DSC02289DSC02306

DSC02301

Snow surface covered with debris

DSC02295

Looking over the lip of the moraine to Mt Hood and MacNeil Point.

DSC02298

View north from our high point – Wy’East Basin, Dollar Lake Fire scar, Washington Cascade peaks.

Hike #33, 7.7 miles, 1700 feet.

Flowers of note:

DSC02324

Fleabane just beginning to bloom.

DSC02326

DSC02336

Pasque flowers – an all-time favorite!

DSC02338

Tour de Fleece Podium

I finished spinning, plying and setting the brown fiber:

I have made headway on this white fluff:

Version 2I spun while cheering on the superhuman athletes who propel themselves on bicycles for 21 days! So many ways to win in Le Tour de France – jerseys, stages, sprints, mountain tops, combatitiveness, even a red lantern for the last place finisher, and I feel I have won too, by spindling every day. I am looking forward to adding more spinning to my crafting time.

 

 

Wildwood Trail and Tour de Fleece

 

June 19, 2019  Wildwood Trail

A short hike this week on the Wildwood trail in the Portland Arboretum. We stayed in the shade, though it is not as hot here as other places right now. Hike #32, 2.6 miles, 200 feet.

Tour de Fleece

It is Tour de France time, which we love, and I have joined the parallel Tour de Fleece. I took a drop spindling class in the fall of 2017 at my local yarn shop. Shortly thereafter, spinning fell by the wayside as I dealt with my acromegaly diagnosis. For Tour de Fleece 2019 I pulled out my drop spindle and remaining fiber samples. I borrowed the Maggie Casey Getting Started on a Drop Spindle DVD from my library. I have been spinning a bit of fiber each night as we fast forward our way through each day’s stage in France. I love seeing the landscape, mountains, castles of France, and the bike race has been exceptionally unpredictable this year. And I feel like I am getting a new feel for spinning, and would love to take another class.

IMG_2476

I have also been knitting my traveling socks, and have started a shawl that is a gift for someone…

Garden

It is berry time at the farmer’s market,

and we have more blooms in the garden.

A trail carved out of the edge of the sky….

7/12/2019 – East Glacier Trail and Timberline Trail, beyond Cloud Cap on Mt Hood, OR

Walking above Cloud Cap on a blue sky day, the same hike we did last year in August.

DSC02032

Beyond the ridgeline of the Eliot East moraine, Mt Hood rises another 5000 feet.

DSC02035

Mt St Helens, Mt Rainier and Mt Adams on view to the north.

dsc02047.jpg

We walked up the crest of the moraine another 1000 feet.

Close-ups of the glaciers from our lunch stop:

Continuing south beyond Cooper Spur shelter, to the trail high point::

DSC02107

Cooper Spur Shelter

DSC02108

DSC02125

meltwater

DSC02112

DSC02142

Cascade peaks to the south: Broken Top, the Three Sisters, Mts Washington and Jefferson.

As we headed back, clouds began collecting and spinning around the peak, 4000 feet above us.

DSC02175DSC02183DSC02187

DSC02188

Another glacier closeup.

It almost seemed like I could step up into the sky….

DSC02172

northbound

A few flowers for the day…

Dwarf alpine flowers and trees, butterflies, rocks, glaciers, meltwater creeks, sublimity. Hike #31, 6 miles, 1650 feet.

Driving down the many switchbacks through the burn zone – white on white.

IMG_2480

beargrass, burned forest, clouds

DSC02210

Mt Adams beyond

 

 

Saddle Mountain, Oregon, June 10, 2019

We have been up this trail many times.The profusion of wildflowers this time of year is always a draw. A combination of shadowy forest and rocky open slopes over 1600 feet of elevation change creates a myriad of habitats and bloom times. We saw at least 66 different types of blooming flowers. I’ve detailed our 2017 hike here. Some standout views for today:

DSC01480

Shady forest

DSC01513

View to the top

DSC01529

The knob

DSC01533

First view of the ocean beyond the knob

DSC01536

Steep chicken wire lined rocky trail up the cliffs

DSC01560

The saddle

DSC01573

Bistort, Mt Rainier

DSC01575

Flowers all the way to the top

 

DSC01612

View to Mt Rainier, Mt St Helens and Mt Adams from the summit

DSC01599

View to Astoria from the summit

DSC01662

Looking back to the sea and the summit on the return hike

 

Notable flowers:

This was hike #27 for 2019, 6.8 miles, 1900 feet.

Wahkeena-Multnomah Loop After the Fire – A Glorious Wildflower Explosion Amidst the Blackened Trees…

June 6, 2019  – Wahkeena-Multnomah Falls Loop

This area was burned by the Eagle Creek Fire of September 2017. The trails above the waterfalls were closed for over a year, then have been reopened and closed periodically since fall 2018. Instability along the trail, falling trees and sliding slopes have been valiantly repaired by our intrepid trail keepers. The trails were open today. We hiked up Wahkeena Creek and down Multnomah Creek. Much of the understory removed by fire has returned as lush greenery. It was a beautiful hike on a beautiful day, and there were sooo many flowers!!! Of course, by the time we circled back around to Multnomah Falls there were also sooo many people, but most don’t  go above the Benson Bridge. I enjoyed my first foray back onto these trails. (Hike #26 for 2019, 5 miles, 1600 feet)

Wahkeena Trail

dsc01046.jpg

Approaching Multnomah Falls from the parking area.

We started by climbing past Wahkeena Falls, and up several hanging garden switchbacks to  Lemmons Viewpoint:

DSC01133

DSC01142

Tiger lily blooming near the viewpoint.

DSC01144

View across the Columbia River

DSC01145

View upriver to Beacon Rock

The trail continues up Wahkeena Creek beyond Fairy Falls and onto the ridge between the drainages:

DSC01185

Fairy Falls

DSC01217

Millions of candy flowers line the burned forest floor.

The next section of trail, along the upper ridgecrest, has always felt very special to me – a quiet flat trail in the deep forest, high on a steep ridge above the river – immensely peaceful and idyllic. My first time through after the fire was trepidatious, but the trail retains it’s magical quality. Despite the scorched trees and more open view, the feeling of peace remains. These trees will all come down at someday. Today I marvel at the explosion of flowers the extra sunlight has nurtured.

DSC01223DSC01232DSC01244

A couple of comparisons from a June 2014 Hike:

DSC01245

2019

DSC07930

2014

WahkeenaTrail

2014

DSC01246

2019

DSC01250

View downslope to the river.

From here, the trail crosses a couple of flowery drainages before heading down to Multnomah Creek:

DSC01306

DSC01269

Larkspur ahead!

DSC01279

DSC01307

Arnica and columbine

DSC01263

Arnica, bleeding heart

DSC01266

Columbine, iris, bleeding heart

Multnomah Creek

The trail passes several waterfalls along Multnomah Creek:

DSC01332

New sign, burned sign

DSC01336

Multnomah Creek

DSC01338

Flower lined trail

DSC01339

Monkey and candy flowers

DSC01350

Ecola Falls

DSC01358

Wiesendanger Falls

DSC01360

Dutchman Falls

A side spur leads out to the viewpoint at the top of Multnomah Falls (where the crowds of people begin):

DSC01411

The top of falls viewpoint

DSC01395

Looking straight down the falls

DSC01406

View of the parking area, river and beyond

A dozen or so paved switchbacks lead down to the trailhead. Lots of people and flowers along the way:

DSC01418

Rebuilt rock wall along the trail

DSC01439

Burned trail post

DSC01451

Approaching the Benson Bridge

DSC01461

Looking down to the view plaza from the bridge

DSC01467

Multnomah Falls from the view plaza

DSC01472

Looking back from the approach area

DSC01473

Burned trees along the ridgeline

IMG_2325

Trailmap

More flowers: